Tag Archives: Health

Chikungunya Cases Rising in Caribbean

klaxonstronghttp://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45972

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A New Mosquito Borne Virus in the Caribbean

klaxonstrongAnother one!

 

http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/43583

http://www.cdc.gov/chikungunya/

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Another Vibrio Vulnificus Case!

klaxonstrongOrlando Sentinel

Scarier… This one very close to home. Why we don’t go in the water and worry about those who do.

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Dangerous bacteria reported off Florida’s coast

klaxonstrong

From the Orlando Sentinel:

“Dangerous bacteria reported off Florida’s coast.

By Jerriann Sullivan, Orlando Sentinel
3:52 pm, September 29, 2013

The death of a Flagler County man has led local health departments to spread the word about vibrio vulnificus, a dangerous bacteria that is found along the Florida coast.

The bacteria can also be ingested through contaminated food.

In addition to the fatal Flagler case, two cases have been reported in Volusia, one in Brevard and three in Hillsborough, said Nathan Dunn, state Department of Health communications director. Details of the fatal case were not immediately available.

In all, 26 cases of vibrio vulnificus have been reported in Florida this year, Dunn said.

Volusia County Health Department spokeswoman Stefany Strong said Sunday that one of the Volusia cases came from exposure to bacteria in the Halifax River. The other was a man who’d eaten raw oysters in Louisiana and became ill when he returned home.

What is vibrio vulnificus?

Part of the same family of bacteria that causes cholera, it requires salt to survive, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. It usually pops up during the summer months in the warm Gulf coast waters.

•Where is it found?

It lives in warm seawater. Swimmers who have open wounds can be exposed to the bacteria. It is also found in contaminated raw seafood, especially oysters, according to the CDC.

•What are the symptoms?

Healthy people who become infected can experience vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain, according to the CDC. For people with an impaired immune system, especially those with chronic liver disease, vibrio vulnificus can infect the bloodstream, causing severe, life-threatening illness with fever, chills, decreased blood pressure and blistering lesions on the skin.

• Can you die from it?

On average blood infections involving vibrio vulnificus are fatal 50 percent of the time, according to the CDC.

• What is its history in the U.S.?

The CDC received reports of more than 900 infections from the Gulf Coast states, where most cases occur, between 1988 and 2006.

• What should someone who gets vibrio vulnificus do first?

See a doctor immediately since antibiotics improve chances of survival.

David Breen contributed; jesullivan@tribune.com or 407-420-5620″

Many thanks to the Orlando Sentinel!

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On Dec 22, 2012 we posted on Dengue Fever in Key West — Now add St. Lucie

klaxonstrong

Dengue

Click for Centers for Disease Control map.

Now we have to add 18+ cases have been reported in the St Lucie area. As noted before, there is no immunization and the disease is bad.

Moving north is bad as well. We have seen the Dengue mosquito here in Brunswick. Sans the virus we hope.

Dengue Fever in Key West

klaxonstrongMy uncle had dengue fever in New Guinea during WWII. He told me about it once. I was 8-9 at the time, so it sounded really bad… Then I studied microbiology in college, and it didn’t just sound bad. For those of us who cruise the territory in question, screens and repellents are an even bigger deal. There is no immunization.

At the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical MedicinAedes aegyptie and Hygiene last month, researchers from the University of Florida revealed that dengue has reappeared in Key West, Fla. The virus they found was not a one-time visitor imported by a tourist or a stray mosquito; it has been on the island long enough to become a genetically distinct, local strain.”